Artwork by Todd Marshall Copyright Todd Marshall/High Country News 

Artwork by Todd Marshall

Copyright Todd Marshall/High Country News 

New clues to the past in Nevada's desert fossils

- Hillary Rosner, High Country News

December 21, 2015

"...A bit farther down the dusty road is a monument to another kind of vanished life, a boneyard from a time not just before humans, but before dinosaurs — 150 million years before T. Rex."


Take a Deep Dive Into The Reasons Land Animals Moved to the Seas

- Smithsonian Magazine Online 

April 16, 2015

Synthesizing decades of discoveries, scientists have revealed links between changing environments and animal movements

Artwork by Karen Carr

Artwork by Karen Carr


How land animals became marine animals: 'They followed their stomachs'

- Splendid Table April 10, 2015

That basically hit a reset button on ecosystems in the ocean. It opened up new opportunities. We think that allowed some of these land animals to start to move in. In a narrower sense, they were probably really adapting to resources that were around them. They followed their stomachs into the ocean.

University professor and undergraduate student continue work with Smithsonian. 

Team uses LiDAR and photogrammetry technology to create 3D scans of Ichthyosaur fossils

- Nevada Today December 27, 2014


                                                                            Illustration of Nothosaurus by Brian Choo.

                                                                            Illustration of Nothosaurus by Brian Choo.

The discovery of a gigantic fanged sea dragon, which hunted the oceans in southwestern China around 247 million years ago, is a sign that global marine ecosystems recovered more broadly than previously thought after the world’s worst mass extinction.

It’s taken 64 years to for scientists to be sure, but they have finally determined that bones found on the North Slope of Alaska’s Brooks Range are those of an ichthyosaur, a giant marine reptile from the time of the dinosaurs.

The Luoping area is famous for its scenery and rich deposits of marine fossils. (ConfuciusInstitute/photo)

The Luoping area is famous for its scenery and rich deposits of marine fossils. (ConfuciusInstitute/photo)

Two paleontologists from UC Davis are among a group of experts advising government leaders in Luoping, China, on fossil conservation and the development of a geological park.

Geologists advise on Chinese fossil park

-UC Davis News September 15, 2010


                                                                     Still from "Ancient Sea Monsters" National Geographic Channel November 2010

                                                                     Still from "Ancient Sea Monsters" National Geographic Channel November 2010

Once we got to the bottom of Fossil Hill, we followed the team as they began to scour the hillside, looking for anything that might be a slight discoloration in the rock. Our hope was to find something that could be considered an “early” Ichthyosaur.

Prehistoric Jaws

-Inside NGC Blog  National Geographic Channel November 17, 2010